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Category: Exercise Tips

The Problem with “Quick Fix” Diets

You’re at your annual physical and your nurse leads you to that dreaded scale. After removing your shoes and all the contents from your pockets, you step on and the number comes up. After a year of quarantine and a year of trying to feel like you’re back to normal living, the number is a bit higher than you’d prefer to see.

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Should You Exercise Through Lower Back Pain?

According to the American Physical Therapy Association, two thirds of Americans have lower back pain sometime during their lives. It’s what to do with and about that pain that matters.  Should you exercise through lower back pain? The common sense answer to you now may be:  if “it hurts when you do this,” then don’t do it.  

All joking aside, chronic lower back pain can result in a lot of adults losing time at work, and it can interfere with normal day to day activities. The last thing you want to do is exacerbate the injury and increase the pain.

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Core Strength: Beyond the Six Pack

Labeled diagram of the muscles inside a human torso

“Show me a six-pack and I will show you dysfunction.”

– Dr. Brett Winchester, DC, DNS Instructor, MPI Board

As the holidays are leaving us and the warmer weather is fast approaching, everyone is hitting the gym doing 45 minutes’ worth of crunches. This quote will hit home and confuse many people. We as a society have been taught to believe that a thin stomach and walking around with a 6-pack is ideal. Unfortunately, we are here to tell you that it is not.

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Teach Me Tuesdays – Bulges and Degeneration

 

As advanced imaging is getting more affordable and available, it is important to point out a few things about your most recent MRI. In the last several years, more doctors have utilized both X-rays and MRI’s to better help explain away why a patient is having specific symptoms; both in the neck and lower back. Studies have shown, however, that a certain degree of degeneration is normal. When using this technology on an asymptomatic subject, or someone who has no complaints of neck or lower back pain, images show that even 30% patients in their 20’s will show at least 1 disc bulge. When we get past the age of 50, we see a rise in this number to at least 60% and the degree of degeneration starts to rise. Finally, 77% of patients over the age of 70 will show at least 1 disc bulge and signs of degeneration in people with no symptoms what-so-ever.

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